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Studies on the biological improvement of permeability in New Zealand grown Douglas fir
1983 - IRG/WP 3231
This report outlines progress towards optimizing conditions for water storage of New Zealand grown Douglas fir with the aim of improving permeability to water-borne preservatives, in particular CCA. Small scale laboratory tests are in progress but the need to scale up to potential commercial applications is being considered. Mixed populations of bacteria isolated from 10 week water sprinkled Dougl...
K J Archer


Effects of Trichoderma harzianum on enzyme activity and oxalic acid production of Gloeophyllum trabeum in ponderosa pine sapwood blocks
1992 - IRG/WP 92-1550
The effect of a bioprotectant, Trichoderma harzianum, on the activity of Gloeophyllum trabeum was investigated using a wood wafer sandwich method. Wood weight loss was greatest with Gloeophyllum trabeum exposed wafers, intermediate with those exposed to both the bioprotectant and decay fungus, and lowest with the bioprotectant exposed wafers. Extracts of wood wafers after 2, 4, or 6 weeks of funga...
C M Sexton, J J Morrell


Effect of Pseudomonas cepacia on the activity of a mixture of wood staining fungi on ponderosa pine sapwood
1995 - IRG/WP 95-10107
There are major incentives for limiting the degree of fungal discoloration which occurs during wood processing. Most lumber producers apply prophylactic fungicides which limit microbial growth, but increasing restrictions on the use of these chemicals have encouraged the search for alternative stain prevention strategies. Among the possible strategies for stain prevention is biological control. Wh...
J J Morrell, R K Velicheti


The role of chitinase in bioprotectant activity against staining fungi
1996 - IRG/WP 96-10175
Chitin is an important structural component of the hyphae of many wood staining fungi and its disruption can lead to dramatic declines in their growth. A number of bioprotectants have been shown to produce chitinases in liquid cultures, but the role of these enzymes in bioprotection remains poorly understood. The levels of these enzymes was studied by inoculating ponderosa pine sapwood wafers with...
J Liu, J J Morrell


Antifungal activity in metabolites from Streptomyces rimosus
1991 - IRG/WP 1495
The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of antifungal metabolites from Streptomyces rimosus for controlling the growth of sapwood-inhabiting fungi: sapstain fungi - Ceratocystis coerulescens, Ceratocystis minor, Ceratocystis pilifera, and Aureobasidum pullulans; mold fungi - Aspergillus niger, Penicillium spp, and Trichoderma spp. Production of antifungal metabolites by Streptomyc...
S C Croan, T L Highley


Ionic liquids with organic and inorganic anions as highly active wood preservatives
2006 - IRG/WP 06-30411
Quaternary ammonium tetrafluoroborates, nitrates(V), propionates, acetates and formates with alkoxymethyl substituents were prepared and tested on wood destroying and sapstaining fungi. These new compounds are ionic liquids (ILs), which penetrate very well into Scot pine wood. Alkoxymethyldecyldimethylammonium tetrafluoroborates and nitrates(V) show better microbial activity against Coniophor...
J Zabielska-Matejuk, A Skrzypczak


The assessment of biological and mechanical properties of wood treated with ionic liquids – N,N-dimethylamine and 1-decylimidazole derivatives
2012 - IRG/WP 12-40582
This paper presents the results of tests of the effectiveness of action of new imidazolium and bis-ammonium ionic liquids against Basidiomycotina and Ascomycotina wood-destroying fungi. All the investigated ionic liquids showed high fungicidal action against Coniophora puteana. In order to characterize the influence of ionic liquids on mechanical wood properties, the compression strength along the...
W Przybylska


A new approach to wood protection: Potential of biologically synthesised CuO and ZnO nanoparticle formulation as a wood preservative
2022 - IRG/WP 22-30758
Even though metal nanoparticles are effective in protecting wood, they are less preferred, as they are synthesised using methods which are expensive and are not environmentally friendly. Biological synthesis of nanoparticles using plants, fungi, yeast, bacteria and viruses, has been accepted as an alternative approach and is referred to as green synthesis. Utilization of biologically synthesised n...
Shiny K S, R Sundararaj, N Mamatha


Biological screening assays of wood samples treated with creosote plus chemical additives exposed to Limnoria tripunctata
1980 - IRG/WP 408
Laboratory methods for exposure of treated wood coupons to Limnoria tripunctata are described. Chemical additions to creosote were screened using this method. Three pesticides, Endrin, Kepone, and Malathion proved particularly effective. The addition of varying percentages of naphthalene to creosote using several treatment methods are currently being assayed. Results to date show that the coupons ...
B R Richards, D A Webb


Penichroa fasciata (Stephens) (Col. Cerambycidae) a pest in wood materials
1988 - IRG/WP 1365
Penichroa fasciata (Stephens) (Col. Cerambycidae) is found to be a frequent pest occurring in hardwood in storage in Italy. This paper reports the characteristic for identification, biological features, distribution and timber liable to attack....
A Gambetta, E Orlandi.


Fungicidal activity of some organic solvents, copper carboxylates and their complexes with 2-aminoethanol
1997 - IRG/WP 97-30136
We evaluated the activity of eight organic solvents against wood - rotting fungus Trametes versicolor in order to choose the most appropriate one for rapid screening tests of some copper(II) carboxylates and their adducts with 2-aminoethanol. Their activity against the selected fungus was classified in the following order: chloroform > N,N-dimethylformamide > acetonitrile > methanol > ...
M Petric, F Pohleven


Biological control with Trichoderma harzianum in relation to the formation for spores the production of soluble metabolites
1994 - IRG/WP 94-10073
The amount of spores produced by three strains of Trichoderma harzianum on the aerial mycelium of agar cultures and in shake cultures, respectively, correlated with the inhibition zones exerted against Phanerochaete chrysosporium in an agar diffusion test. The amount of soluble antifungal metabolites as well as the protein content also correlated with the inhibition zones and the amount of spores ...
J Bürgel, E Horvath, J Haschka, K Messner


Chemical compounds from Eperua falcata and Eperua grandiflora heartwood and their biological activities against wood destroying fungus (Coriolus versicolor)
2005 - IRG/WP 05-30373
The chemistry analysis of the compounds present in dichloromethane and ethanolic fraction as well as bioassays enables to understand the durability differences of Eperua falcata and Eperua grandiflora. The principal distinction between these two species is the acidic subfraction of diterpenoic extract, which is antifungic in Eperua falcata when tested in in-vitro conditions. This study also enable...
N Amusant, C Moretti, B Richard, E Prost, J M Nuzillard, M-F Thévenon


Temperature influence on the growing velocity and cellulolytic activities of Poria placenta strains from several locations
1986 - IRG/WP 2263
The differences observed on the FPRL 280 Poria Placenta strain at several Research European Laboratories for determining up the fungicide effectiveness of wood preservative has carry us to do a comparative study about the cellulolytic activity and growth velocity of each of this strains at different temperatures (22, 24 and 28°C). The results show significative differences when the temperature is...
A M Navarrete, M T De Troya


Biological control of the Formosan subterranean termite Coptotermes formosanus Shiraki
1971 - IRG/WP 100
M Tamashiro, J K Fujii, P Lai, T E Richardson


Working Group I 'Biological Problems' Sub-group 'Insects in dry wood (other than termites)', Scope of work
1976 - IRG/WP 152
S Cymorek


Antagonistic effects of a range of fungi to Serpula lacrymans
1996 - IRG/WP 96-10156
Certain fungi have been demonstrated to exhibit antagonism towards Serpula lacrymans in culture. Species from the genera Trichoderma, Gliocladium, Penicillium and Hypomyces were among those exhibiting the strongest antagonism. Certain species showed antagonism in a range of media of varying nutritional status. The possible role of antagonistic fungi as biocontrol agents for Serpula lacrymans is di...
P Rattray, G McGill, D D Clarke


Physical and biological properties of albizzia waferboards modified with cross-linking agents
1995 - IRG/WP 95-40043
Chemically-modified low-density waferboards with cross-linking agents were produced using a fast-growing species of hardwood albizzia (Paraserienthes falcata Becker) as a raw materials and isocyanate resin as a glue adhesive. For the chemical modification, the vapor-phase formalization of the boards and the pad-dry-cure treatment of wafers with cross-linking agents were employed. The vapor-phase f...
S Yusuf, Y Imamura, M Takahashi, K Minato


Decay resistance of wood removed from poles treated with Trichoderma
1989 - IRG/WP 1386
Wood blocks removed from a distribution pole previously treated with a biological control product (Binab FYT pellets) were exposed in soil block tests to selected basidiomycetes. The blocks were removed from regions of poles where Trichoderma colonization had been confirmed by extensive sampling and computer mapping of microbial inhabitants. The results indicate that material from pole interiors c...
A Bruce, B King, T L Highley


Biological Durability of Laminated Veneer Lumber from Durable and Non-Durable Wood Species
2005 - IRG/WP 05-10567
Laminated Veneer Lumber (LVL) was laboratory manufactured using veneers from decay and non decay resistant species in order to evaluate changes in the durability as a result of the LVL manufacturing process, and to test if the mixing of decay resistant species and non decay resistant species can improve durability. Laboratory soil block test and field test were conducted. The durability of solid w...
P Nzokou, J Zyskowski, S Boury, D P Kamdem


Biological performance of gypsum products containing borates
2000 - IRG/WP 00-30237
At suitable retentions borates have biostatic properties enabling them to be used for biodeterioration control in wood. They provide protection against decay fungi, mould, and termites, which are known to also attack gypsum products. Currently, many gypsum products contain added borates, which are used to improve physical and processing characteristics. Work examining the effect of borates at cont...
J L Fogel, J D Lloyd


Possibility of use of wood species per class of biological risks. Attempt to determine criteria based on Pr EN 350-1/2/3
1992 - IRG/WP 92-2409
M Rayzal


European standardization for wood preservation
1990 - IRG/WP 2359
G Castan


Questionnaire for Volume 2 of the basidiomycete monographs
1985 - IRG/WP 1254
12 monographs of wood destroying basidiomycetes were published in volume 1. Volume 2 includes the following 17 basidiomycetes: Antrodia serialis, Chondrostereum purpureum, Climacocystic borealis, Fomitopsis pinicola, Hyphoderma tenue, Lentinus degener, Lentinus squarrulosus, Paxillus panuoides, Phellinus contiguus, Poria xantha, Pycnoporus sanguineus, Rigidoporus vitreus, Serpula himantoides, Sistotrema brinkmannii, Stereum sanguinolentum, Trametes corrugata
T Nilsson


Biological control of decay in standing creosote-treated poles
1976 - IRG/WP 156
Internal decay caused by basidiomycetes in standing creosoted poles can be controlled biologically, it seems, by artificial inoculation near the ground line. For such inoculation IC-type facultative mycoparasites, Scytalidium sp FY strain or Trichoderma spp for example, may be used. Apparent residual action can be explained by the release of non water soluble chemically stable antibiotics from the...
J Ricard


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