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Resistance of heat treated Ash wood under steam pressure: rot fungi, soil micro-organisms and termites
2016 - IRG/WP 16-40724
Thermal modification processes have been developed to increase the biological durability and dimensional stability of wood. The aim of this paper was to study the influence of ThermoWood® treatment intensity on wood decay resistance improvement against soil-inhabiting micro-organisms, brown/white rots and termite’s exposures. All of the tests were carried out in the laboratory with two different complementary research materials. The main research material consisted of Ash (Fraxinus excelsior L.) wood thermally modified at temperatures of 170ºC, 200ºC, 215ºC and 230ºC. The reference materials were untreated Ash, Beech and Pine woods, for each biological test. An agar block test was used to determine the resistance to two brown-rot and two white-rot fungus according to CEN/TS 15083-1 (2005) directives. Durability against soil-inhabiting micro-organisms was determined relating to the CEN/TS 15083-2 (2005) directives, by measuring the Weight Loss, modulus of elasticity (MOE) and Modulus of rupture (MOR) after incubation periods of 24, 32 and 90 weeks. Finally, Reticulitermes santonensis specie was used for the termite’s exposure non choice screening test with a size sample adjustment according to EN 117 (2005) standard directives. Thermal modification increased the biological durability of all samples. However, high thermal modification temperature over 215°C, representing by a wood mass loss (ML %) due to thermal degradation of 20%, was needed to reach resistance against decay comparable with the durability classes of ‘‘durable’’ or ‘‘very durable’’ in the soil bed test. The brown-rot and white-rot tests gave slightly better durability classes than the soil bed test. Whatever heat treatment conditions, thermally modified ash wood was not efficient against termite’s attacks.
K Candelier, S Hannouz, M-F Thévenon, D Guibal, P Gérardin, M Pétrissans, R Collet


Effect of acetylation on decay resistance of wood against brown-rot, white-rot and soft-rot fungi
1989 - IRG/WP 3540
Effect of acetylation on decay resistance of wood was investigated using wood blocks of Cryptomeria japonica, Pinus densiflora, Albizia falcata and Fagus crenata. Blocks were treated with uncatalyzed acetic anhydride for different lengths of time and exposed to Tyromyces palustris, Serpula lacrymans, Coriolus versicolor and unsterilized soil. The action of OH-radical on acetylated wood was also examined using Fenton's reagent. The enhancement of decay resistance by acetylation was revealed clearly for all cases of exposures but varying with fungal and wood species used. For a brown-rot fungus Tyromyces palustris, the weight loss reached almost nil in all woods at 20 WPG (weight percent gain) of acetylation, after the striking decrease from 10 to 15 WPG. For a white-rot fungus Coriolus versicolor, it was counted until 12-15 WPG in the perishable hardwoods used, but not in a softwood Cryptomeria japonica, even at 6 WPG. In cases of another brown-rotter Serpula lacrymans and soil burial, effect of acetylation was intermediate between Tyromyces palustris and Coriolus versicolor. Anti-degradation mechanism by acetylation was discussed, from these weight loss - weight gain relationships, and the IR-and 13C-NMR spectral analyses of fungus-exposed wood.
M Takahashi, Y Imamura, M Tanahashi


A comparison of soft rot, white rot and brown rot in CCA, CCP, CCF, CCB, TCMTB and benzalkonium chloride treated Pinus radiata IUFRO stakes, after 9-15 years exposure at five test sites in New Zealand
1991 - IRG/WP 1485
The aim of this study was to determine if decay type varies significantly between five field trial test sites of different soil type, aspect and climate in 9-15 year old, replicate CCA, CCF, CCP. CCB, TCMTB and AAC treated IUFRO stakes. A visual on-site assessment of decay type on every test stake was made and observations confirmed by microscopical examination. Regression analyses were used to determine significant differences of percentage frequency of occurrence of each rot type between sites and preservatives. Large differences in percentage frequency of occurrence of rot type were evident between sites. One site was dominated by brown rot (85%) and two were dominated by soft rot (99 and 91%). The fourth site had intermediate proportions of brown rot (40%) and soft rot (71%) but had the second highest occurrence of white rot (32%) (highest = 37%; lowest = 11%). The fifth site was distinct in that a large proportion of stakes (69%) had both well established brown rot and soft rot. Stakes at the other four sites tended to have only one rot type. Some highly significant preservative effects were also found. Possible causes of these differences are discussed in terms of inter-site soil type, climate and other differences.
R N Wakeling


Questionnaire - Fungal decay types
1985 - IRG/WP 1265
T Nilsson


Effects of acetylation on the dimensional stability and decay resistance of kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.) fiberboard
1996 - IRG/WP 96-40059
The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of the acetylation treated kenaf fiber, Phenol formaldehyde resin content level, and three fungi species on the dimensional stability and decay resistance of high density non wood composition boards. A standard ASTM method was used to evaluate weight loss and thickness change. The linear shrinkage and expansion of each species were also determined. All specimens were exposed to decay chambers for 16 weeks. Test results indicated that most of the main factors significantly influence the thickness, length changes, and decay resistance of the high density kenaf fiberboards.
P Chow, T Harp, R Meimban, J A Youngquist, R M Rowell


Types of decay observed in CCA-treated pine posts in horticultural situations in New Zealand
1984 - IRG/WP 1226
The few reported failures of 11-12-year-old horticultural posts in New Zealand in 1982 were caused by brown-rot. A subsequent survey of CCA-treated posts in all the major horticultural areas has revealed decay of many posts. A microscopic examination of these posts has shown decay by brown-rot, white-rot, soft-rot and bacteria. Several types of bacterial decay have been observed.
J A Drysdale, M E Hedley


The dry rot fungus and other fungi in houses. Part 2
1993 - IRG/WP 93-10001
J Bech-Andersen


Extracellular layers of wood decay fungi and copper tolerance
1983 - IRG/WP 1180
Extracellular layers around the hyphae of brown, white and soft rot fungi have been examined using electron microscopy. These layers were isolated for identification. Particular interest was directed towards the extracellular layers of copper-tolerant soft rot fungi.
D M Francis, L E Leightley


Physical and biological properties of albizzia waferboards modified with cross-linking agents
1995 - IRG/WP 95-40043
Chemically-modified low-density waferboards with cross-linking agents were produced using a fast-growing species of hardwood albizzia (Paraserienthes falcata Becker) as a raw materials and isocyanate resin as a glue adhesive. For the chemical modification, the vapor-phase formalization of the boards and the pad-dry-cure treatment of wafers with cross-linking agents were employed. The vapor-phase formalization was conducted for 5, 10 and 24 hours using tetraoxane as a source of formaldehyde, and the pad-dry-cure treatments with glutaraldehyde and ethyleneurea compound (DMDHEU) were made after impregnation of their 5 and 10% aqueous solutions of each chemical. Sulfur dioxide was used as a catalyst in both treatments. About 70% of antiswelling efficiency (ASE) was gained in all treated boards irrespective of reaction time or solution concentration. All treated boards were very stable to water soaking even in the 2-hour boiling on thickness swelling as well as linear expansion. Laboratory tests with brown-rot and white-rot fungi revealed that decay was completely suppressed in formaldehyde-treated boards, and small losses in weight were counted in other treated boards. All treated boards were also effective in resisting to the attack by the destructive termite Coptotermes formosanus.
S Yusuf, Y Imamura, M Takahashi, K Minato


Characterization of glycopeptide from white-, brown- and soft rot fungi
2002 - IRG/WP 02-10424
Extracellular low-molecular-weight substances that catalyze a redox reaction between O2 and electron donors to produce hydroxyl radicals have been isolated from wood degrading cultures of white-rot, brown-rot, and soft-rot fungi. They contained protein, neutral carbohydrate, and Fe(II). These substances were glycosylated (glycated) peptides and suggested to form Amadori product (ketoamine). The glycopeptides are involved in all three types of decay.
H Tanaka, S Itakura, A Enoki


Ibuprofen inhibits in vitro growth of brown-rot fungi
1996 - IRG/WP 96-10160
Ibuprofen, a phenyl propionic acid derivative (2-(4-isobutylphenyl)propionic acid) inhibited growth in vitro of 17 brown-rot fungi at a concentration of 100 µg/mL, while exhibiting no growth inhibition for 8 white-rot fungi at the same concentration. Propionic acid did not inhibit fungal growth in vitro. Morphological changes were noted in fungi that were able to grow in the presence of ibuprofen.
C A Clausen


Electron microscopic detection and chemical analysis of three-lamellar structures in wood-destroying fungi
1984 - IRG/WP 1240
In the course of transmission electron microscopical investigations of pine wood decay by various brown- and white-rot fungi extracellular three-lamellar structures (TLS) formed by the fungi were found in specimens stained with ruthenium red. These structures occured in the lumen of the wood cell surrounding the hypha at the outermost layer of the fungal cell wall. In the course of the investigations these structures were also detected in fungi cultivated with glucose on a rotary shaker, where they showed forms similar to tubuli and vesicles. The three-lamellar structures formed by the white-rot fungus Sporotrichum pulverulentum, which were contained in the outermost cell wall layer, were isolated by disintegration of the fungal pellet and subsequent digestion of the fungal cell wall by snail enzyme. It was found that these structures are resistant to the enzymatic digestion and are composed of 80 to 90% carbohydrates, mainly consisting of glucose monomeres, 5 to 10% proteins, containing 5 fractions with molecular weights between 30000 and 200000, and finally 5 to 10% lipids which do not contain any phospholipid.
R Foisner, K Messner, H Stachelberger, M Röhr


Some physiological characteristics of a non-degradative strain of Postia (=Poria) placenta
1988 - IRG/WP 1341
The decay capacity of 14 strains of the brown-rot fungus Postia (= Poria) placenta was determined using soil-wood block tests. One isolate was identified as being unable to degrade wood and was determined to be monokaryotic. It retained the ability to produce extracellular carbohydrate-degrading enzymes, although regulation of certain enzymes was atypical under certain cultural conditions. It produced H2O2 and oxalic acid under a variety of carbon and nitrogen regimes, and did not contain double-stranded RNA. It failed to produce large quantities of extracellular polysaccharides in culture. An understanding of the physiology of this isolate would further our knowledge of decay mechanisms leading to safer preservation protocols.
J A Micales, T L Highley


Defining fungal decay types - Final proposal
1988 - IRG/WP 1355
The term soft rot is proposed for all forms of decay caused by Ascomycetes and non-basidiomyceteous Fungi imperfecti. The terms brown rot and white rot should be used only for decay caused by Basidiomycetes. Brown rot is characterized by extensive depolymerization of the cellulose and limited lignin degradation. White rot is characterised by significant degradation of the lignin component in wood.
T Nilsson


The potential of 2-deoxy-D-glucose as an active ingredient in wood preservation
1999 - IRG/WP 99-30205
2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DOG) is a potential active ingredient against wood decaying fungi. When dissolved in water, it can be used in pressure treatment of wood. Thereby the wood is protected from attack by wood decaying fungi. A concentration of 1.5% (mean retention 9.7 kg/cubic meter sap-wood) is adequate for brown rot fungi, and 3% (mean retention 19.5 kg/cubic meter sapwood) will also provide protection against white rot fungi. 2-DOG is easily soluble in water, and is therefore easily leached from the wood upon completion of the preservation process. Different types of fixa-tion methods have been tried and evaluated. It is possible to produce 2-DOG by the hydrolysis of chitin, a constituent of the exterior skeleton of shellfish and insects. There is a potential for exploita-tion of this waste product provided by the crab and shrimp industry. The yield of 1 kg of fresh shrimp is 75 g of 2-DOG.
O V Frederiksen, A P Koch


Effects of some essential oils on wood destroying organisms
1993 - IRG/WP 93-10047
Three wood destroying fungi: Botryodiplodia theobromae Pat. (stain), Gloeophyllum sepiarium (brown rot), and Pycnoporus sanguineus (white rot) were exposed to six plant essential oils: the peppermint, kaffir lime or leech lime, lavender, tarragon, holy basil, and the eucalyptus. The peppermint oil showed most effective to inhibit fungal growth, while eucalypus oil was the least effective. The other oils inhibition rate varied according to the species of fungi. In the experiment of the powder post beetles Heterobostrychus aequalis Waterh., the insects were killed within three days in the oil of tarragon, eucalyptus and holy basil, while in lavender oil they could live to ten days the same as controls. But on the contrary in the oil of peppermint and kaffir lime, some of them could even lived longer than the controls.
K Atisongkroh, C Anantachoke, P Lekuthai, S Pensook, T Kittirattrakarn


Basidiosporogenesis by brown-rot basidiomycetes in vitro
1995 - IRG/WP 95-10126
Basidiospores of wood-rotting basidiomycetes are a primary sourse of infection causing wood biodeterioration, especially in wood above ground. Most studies evaluating wood preservatives have used mycelia or basidiospores obtained from wild mushrooms. The objective of this study was to demonstrate in vitro methods that promote carpogenesis and basidiosporogenesis by the brown-rot fungi Antrodia carbonisa, Neolentinus lepideus, and Postia placenta. After preincubation in the dark at 27°C for 3 to 11 days, basidiospores were easily prodused in 1 to 4 months by basidiomata exposed to light at 12°C. Adequate light exposure, aeration, and low temperature treatment after preincubation are essential for fruiting body formation of these brown-rot basidiomycetes. The morphology of the basidiomata differed according to the basidiomycetes and the medium used. These results demonstrate that an enormous quantity of basidiosporee can be easily and continuously prodused in 2 to 4 months in vitro.
S C Croan


Spatial arrangement of lignin peroxidase in pine decayed by Phanerochaete chrysosporium and Fomitopsis pinicola
1988 - IRG/WP 1343
By applying immunoelectronmicroscopic methods, lignin peroxidase of the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium has been localized in the cytoplasm of hyphae, close to the plasmalemma and on the plasmalemma. Infiltration of wood specimen with culture filtrates, concentrated 300-fold, gave clear information on the penetration of the enzyme into the wood cell wall. Penetration was restricted to superficial areas. No diffusion of enzymes into the cell wall took place in white rot. Likewise, infiltration of wood. degraded by the brown rot fungus Fomitopsis pinicola, did not indicate free diffusion of the enzyme within the cell wall. This was taken as a proof of non-ezymatic cell wall degradation in brown rot.
E Srebotnik, K Messner


Differential behaviour of wood rotters at water repellent Rubberwood
2000 - IRG/WP 00-10386
Rubberwood samples treated with different concentration of aqueous solution of chromic acid has induced significant increase in water repellency and attains dimensional stability. Though water repellency and dimensional stability was achieved by treatment, the fungal invasion could not be completely controlled. Differential level of decay of brown and white rot in wood treated with water repellent compound is observed. Wood shows complete protection from white rot but failed to prevent the invasion of brown rot in water repellent rubber wood. These treatments were found to be very effective even at a low concentration of 2.5% in protecting decay due to white rots as compared to brown rot. Effectiveness of these treatments against white rot may be attributed to formation of lignin-chromic acid complex.
H C Nagaveni, S S Chauhan, K S Rao


Involvement of hydrogen peroxide in wood decay by brown-rot and white-rot fungi
1985 - IRG/WP 1256
To gain further understanding of the role of H2O2 in wood degradation by brown- and white-rot fungi, we studied the following: (a) extracellular H2O2 production, (b) effect of various hydroxyl radical (·OH) and singlet O2 (1O2) quenching agents on wood and cellulose degradation, (c) intracellular H2O2 production and catalase activity, and (d) cytochemical localization of H2O2 with diaminobenzidine (DAB) during wood degradation. Extracellular H2O2 detection varied with the growth media and chromogen. The chromogen 2,2'-azino-di-(3-ethyl benzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS) was more sensitive than o-dianisidine. Extracellular H2O2 was not detected in half of the brown-rot fungi. One white-rot fungus did not produce detectable amounts of H2O2. ·OH and 1O2 quenching agents generally did not inhibit decay of wood or decomposition of cellulose by either brown- or white-rot fungi. DAB did not detect the presence of H2O2 within or outside cells of the brown-rot fungus, Poria placenta. Nor was H2O2 -generating activity detected in sonicated extracts of this fungus. With the white-rot fungus, Coriolus versicolor, H2O2 occurred predominantly in the periplasmic space, but also in the cytoplasm and hyphal sheath. Sonicates of Coriolus versicolor contained H2O2 -generating activity. These observations provide further support for H2O2 involvement in degradation of wood by white-rot fungi, but raise doubts concerning its participation in wood degradation by brown-rot fungi.
T L Highley, L L Murmanis


Preservation of hyphal-forming brown- and white-rot wood-inhabiting basidiomycetes
2001 - IRG/WP 01-10397
Lyophilization is an excellent technique for the long-term preservation of hyphal-forming brown- and white-rot wood-inhabiting basidiomycotina. However, vegetative mycelial isolates are not lyophilizable. In this study, 10 brown-rot and 10 white-rot basidiomycetous non-sporulating, non-chlamydosporulating, and non-bubillerferous basidiomycetes fungi were tested for viability after lyophilization. Optimization of the lyophilization involved (i) using mycelium agar plugs and mycelial fragments, (ii) improving physiological growth conditions, age of cultures, and growth medium components, (iii) adding to and adjusting the cold hardening period, initial-freezing rates, and dehydration and rehydration, and (iv) standardizing lyoprotectant type and concentration. All fungal growth on solid agar medium or in broth survived lyophilization. No noticeable changes in viability or morphological and biochemical characteristics occurred. Some mycelial isolates exhibited heavy filamentous mycelial growth and/or grew faster after lyophilization.
S C Croan


Biological resistance of phenol-resin treated wood
1990 - IRG/WP 3602
Biological resistance of PF (phenol formaldehyde resin) - treated wood has been tested in relation to the resin properties, wood species and biological factors. When tested using water-soluble PF (mol. wt. 170), ca. 10% RI (resin impregnation) was enough to suppress the decay of Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria japonica) and western hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla) blocks exposed to Tyromyces palustris (brown-rot type) and Coriolus versicolor (white-rot type). For a decay suppression of Japanese beech (Fagus crenata) by treating with the same PF, ca. 20% RI was required for both cases of exposure. When using ethanol-soluble PF (mol. wt. 300), the lesser effect on decay suppression was revealed for most of wood-fungus combinations, suggesting a possible better penetration of lower molecular resin into the wood cell walls. PF treatment of wood also affected the termite Coptotermes formosanus, causing the severe depletion of feeding activity and the higher mortality at 5-15 (%) RI. Of the three species of symbiotic protozoa, the most cellulolytic Pseudotrichonympha grassii diminished first shortly after feeding.
M Takahashi, Y Imamura


Biodegradation of acetylated southern pine and aspen composition boards
1994 - IRG/WP 94-40020
This objective of this study was to investigate the influence of the acetylation treated wood fiber, Phenol-formaldehyde resin content level, two wood fiber species, three fungi species on the dimensional stability and decay resistence of high density composition boards. A standard ASTM method was used to evaluate weight loss and thickness change. The linear shrinkage and expansion of each species were also determined. All specimens were exposed to decay chambers for 16 weeks. Test results indicated that most of the main factors significantly influence the thickness and length changes and the decay resistance of the high density composition boards.
P Chow, T Harp, R Meimban, J A Youngquist, R M Powell


Decay types observed in small stakes of pine and Alstonia scholaris inserted in different types of unsterile soil
1990 - IRG/WP 1443
The attack of various wood-degrading microorganisms occurring in mini-stakes of pine and Alstonia scholaris buried in various types of unsterile soil was studied. Attacks by white rot, brown rot, soft rot, erosion bacteria, tunnelling bacteria and actinomycetes were found. Soft rot occurred in all soils, whereas attack by white rot and especially brown rot and erosion bacteria was rare. The type of soil influenced the occurrence of attack by tunnelling bacteria and actinomycetes. The former were mainly associated with horticultural soils whereas the latter were associated with soils from coniferous forests.
T Nilsson, G F Daniel


Biosynthesis of ß-Glucan microfibrils by cellular fractions from brown-rot fungus Postia placenta (MAD-698 and ME-20) and white-rot fungus Schizophyllum commune (MAD-619)
1993 - IRG/WP 93-10025
In this study, we compared the brown rot fungus Postia placenta (MAD-698 and ME-20) with the white rot fungus Schizophyllum commune (MAD-619) to determine the location and distribution of glucan synthetase. We also measured the soluble protein content in subcellular fractions obtained by differential centrifugation MAD-698 is a degradative isolate, but ME-20 and MAD-619 do not produce significant weight loss in wood. The solubilized enzyme glucan synthetase catalyzes the UDP [U-l4C] glucose to synthesize an insoluble linear 1,3-ß-D-glucan polymer. Glucan is a component of basidiomycete cell walls and hyphal sheath. The wood-degrader MAD-698 showed the most glucan synthetase activity in the mixed membrane fractions, and the nondegradative isolates ME-20 and MAD-619 had the most activity in the cytoplasmic fractions. In fact, glucan synthetase activity was found in different proportions in different particulate fractions of MAD-698, ME-20, and MAD-619. Treatment with a mixture of the detergents octylglucoside and CHAPS ( 3 -[(3-Cholamidopropyl)-dimethylammonio]-1-propane-sulfonate) increased the glucan synthetase activity only in the cell wall fraction.
S C Croan, T L Highley


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