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Report on a field demonstration of methods for detecting defects in wood poles
1984 - IRG/WP 2232
P I Morris, H Friis-Hansen


The use of the Pilodyn for detecting soft-rot decay in CCA treated eucalypt poles
1986 - IRG/WP 2251
A 6 Joule Pilodyn unit with 2.5 mm diameter pin was used to inspect CCA treated eucalypt poles, suspected of suffering groundline soft-rot decay. Pole plugs were removed at the inspection region and the amount of soft-rot decay present determined microscopically. High correlation (R² = 0.73) was obtained between the amount of soft-rot and Pilodyn pin penetration. The Pilodyn is recommended as a u...
L E Leightley, G A Willoughby


The use of immunofluorescence labelling for detecting Ophiostoma piceae in radiata pine
1998 - IRG/WP 98-10268
The primary objective of the current investigation is to understand fungal interactions of dominant sapstaining fungi in radiata pine using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). In the current paper, an immunofluorescence labelling technique was developed for detection of Ophiostoma piceae using a monoclonal antibody. The primary antibody was labelled with Oregon green 514 Goat anti-mouse Ig...
Ying Xiao, B Kreber, C Breuil


Examination of the Pilodyn as a non-destructive test method for detecting decay in CCA treated eucalypt poles
1982 - IRG/WP 2177
Below groundline condition of 274 CCA treated eucalypt poles comprising 13 different species was examined using 6 and 12 Joule Pilodyn units with 2 and 2.5 mm diameter pins. The data obtained was used to calculate regressions of density on pin penetration. A decrease in density was accompanied by an increase in pin penetration. The best correlation was found using the 6 Joule, 60 x 2.5 mm² diamet...
L E Leightley


Summarized comparison of four techniques for detecting defects in poles
1979 - IRG/WP 2126
Since our discussions in open session of Working Group II at Peebles, a number of workers in Australia have collaborated in comparing the efficacy of X-ray, sonic testing, or resistivity measurements for detecting internal defects in poles. The purpose of this circular is to draw to your attention some of the results, in summary form. No attempt has been made to compare techniques. More detailed a...
H Greaves


Sampling rates and the probability of detecting defective treatment in the sampling of preservative treated timber
1987 - IRG/WP 2277
When attempting to enforce standards of penetration and retention set for treated timber, the regulating authority must establish a sampling or inspection scheme which will prevent large quantities of substandard product entering the market. On the other hand, the scheme should not penalise treaters for the small quantities of such material which are inevitably produced by any industrial process. ...
M J Kennedy, L E Leightley


Using AE monitoring for detecting economically important species of termites in California
1991 - IRG/WP 2375
Acoustic emission (AE) monitoring was conducted on wooden samples containing three economically important species of termites in California (dampwood termite, Zootermopsis nevadensis, Western drywood termite, Incisitermes minor, and Western subterranean termite, Reticulitermes hesperus). Laboratory AE studies included varying termite species, as well as 7 day studies exploring the periodicity of t...
V R Lewis, R L Lemaster, F C Beall, D L Wood


A novel device for detecting internal defects in wooden poles
1989 - IRG/WP 2329
The diagnosis of internal defects caused by termites and decay in hardwood transmission poles has been investigated using a novel Automatic Feed Drill (AFD) pole testing device. Internal defects were recognised by changes in drill feed-rate as the automatic air-driven drill traversed its 100 mm working stroke. The instrument is portable, simple to operate and recognises defects instantaneously. Te...
R A Eaton, R S Johnstone


The use of the Shigometer® and Pilodyn® as non-destructive test methods for detecting decay in CCA treated eucalypt poles
1981 - IRG/WP 2153
The groundline condition of sixty C.C.A. treated eucalypt poles comprising six different species was examined using the Pilodyn® and Shigometer®. Although sensitive to the presence of soft-rot decay, the Shigometer® would seem to offer little practical advantage in the eucalypt soft-rot decay situation, since a comparable visual examination could reveal the presence and extent of decay. Initial...
L E Leightley


The new method of detecting decay in poles
1984 - IRG/WP 2229
In 1982 the Swedish Telecoms Administration in corporation with the Swedish Dog Training Centre started to investigate the possibility of using dogs for detecting decay in poles. At present two German Sheppheards and two Labrador Retrievers are in operation and the results have up to now well fulfilled our expectations. The following results have been obtained: 1.) The dogs can with high reliabili...
A Ammer, B Svedberg


Immunoassays for detecting and tracking wood-protecting chemicals
1998 - IRG/WP 98-50101-10
To respond to new environmental regulations, forest products industries are reducing or eliminating the release into the environment of chemicals used to protect wood products. For this, mills need tools that support practical and reliable programs for monitoring concentrations of wood protectants in processes and the environment. Conventionally, wood preservatives are detected mainly by gas-liqui...
C Breuil, J Bull


Permeability measurements on surface layers for detecting wood with abnormally high permeability
1988 - IRG/WP 2298
Wet storage of timber during the warm period of the year may lead to an increased permeability of the wood, an undesirable phenomenon for several wood industries and also for many end-uses. Neither before nor after drying, such wood with "wet storage damage" can be visually distinguished from wood with a normal permeability. A non-destructive method for inspecting the permeability of surface layer...
J B Boutelje, G Hägglund


Evaluation of rapid methods for detecting wood preservatives in waste wood
1994 - IRG/WP 94-50024
For the disposal of wood waste under ecological sound conditions information about its hazardous potential is required. Several analytical methods are available for the detection of most elements in wood preservatives. Industrial process conditions, however, demand methods with very short turn around times. In this research several methods of analysis were judged on their speed and accuracy. A num...
W J Homan, H Militz


Detecting fungal DNA in treated and non-treated wood
2007 - IRG/WP 07-10621
Isolating fungi from wood has long involved culturing on selective media followed by identification using various keys. This process can be cumbersome, costly, and, most importantly, not always capable of detecting all of the fungi present. The recent development of molecular methods for isolation and identification of fungi has created tremendous opportunities for expanding our knowledge of the...
C Freitag, M Freitag, J Morrell


DNA-based tools for rapidly detecting, quantifying and monitoring ophiostomatoid fungi on beetles, in trees and wood products
2010 - IRG/WP 10-20450
Approximately half of the trees harvested for commercial purposes are lost because of native or introduced insects or insect-vectored microorganisms. Ophiostomatoid fungi, which are well adapted to dissemination by insects, include ~140 species of saprobes and pathogens. They are present worldwide, have high economical impact and many are subject to quarantine regulation. Thus, it is necessary to ...
L Khadempour, Young Woon Lim, S Massoumi Alamouti, C Breuil


Non-destructive evaluation of termite and decay damaged to timber-in- service
2010 - IRG/WP 10-20451
A leading joint research project was financed by the ARC, engaging some of the leading Universities in Australia, to look at field techniques to determine if timber-in-service is infested with termites and decay fungi after which microwave technology will be employed to eliminate the termites and/or decay in-situ. The next step will be to quantify the damage caused on the sectional dimensions of t...
C Adam, B M Ahmed Shiday, G Brodie