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A practical method to evaluate the dimensional stability of wood and wood products
1990 - IRG/WP 2342
This paper presents a new simple method to evaluate wood and wood products for their resistance to swelling and to assess wood preservatives for their ability to dimensionally stabilize treated wood exposed to water. Permeable wood of various dimensions and treated with different preserving chemicals have been measured for swelling in the radial and tangential direction during immersion in liquid water. The results indicate that a simple exponential function describing the dimension of the samples during immersion can be used to evaluate both the water-repellency and anti-swelling effectiveness of wood preserving chemicals. The results can be achieved in reasonable time, and the parameters of the function can be determined by a commercial desk-top computer program.
J P Hösli


Long-term performance of a "wax" type additive for use with water-borne pressure preservative treatments
2000 - IRG/WP 00-40159
Field performance results are updated for matched CCA treated decking boards with and without an emulsion water repellent additive incorporated with the initial pressure treatment. Decks have been exposured for over 9 years in Harrisburg, NC. Boards were evaluated for in-service and laboratory performance for water repellent efficacy, as well as additive loadings in the boards after this exposure. All results support that these additives can provide long-term protection against many of the physical defects that develop in pressure treated wood during exposure.
A R Zahora


Dimensional stabilization of wood with dimethylol compounds
1987 - IRG/WP 3412
This study showed that a substantial degree of dimensional stability can be imparted to wood by crosslinking with low concentrations of dimethyloldihydroxyethyleneurea. It was demonstrated that by selecting the right catalyst system the cure temperature can be reduced to the point that strength loss of the treated wood is minimized.
D D Nicholas, A D Williams


Combined effects of the treatment of wood with formaldehyde
1978 - IRG/WP 3117
Treatment of fibrous materials with reagents in a vapor phase is neither new nor unique. Numerous examples exist in literature of vapor phase experiments on cellulose fibers and fabrics, and on wood. For many years the textile research and industry have used vapor phase processes for the treatment of textiles. The chemical modification of cellulose is based on different types of reactions e.g. esterification, alkylation, resin formation or polymerization, monomer grafting and crosslinking. Vapor phase treatment of wood offers certain potential advantages over the conventional liquid phase wood impregnation. The higher mobility of low molecular weight compounds in the gaseous state ensures a rapid, uniform and homogeneous distribution throughout the wood structure. The vapor phase treatment of wood is also a better approach from the standpoint of cell wall penetration. Bulking, which takes place in the cell wall only, means that less chemicals are required and that the final weight of the composite is limited. Furthermore, due to the low viscosity of a gas, the application of a lower pressure differential remains possible. Within the framework of a wood improvement programme carried out at the Laboratory of Wood Biology and Wood Technology (University of Ghent, Belgium) the treatments were based on the impregnation of wood with liquid synthetic monomers and with gaseous formaldehyde. The results of the hygroscopic and dimensional behaviour of the wood-plastic-combinations have been published previously. Other papers deal with the physical and chemical interactions between the synthetic products and the natural polymers of the cell wall. This contribution will be restricted to the treatment of wood with formaldehyde in the gaseous state.
M Stevens, J Schalck


Treatment of wood with formaldehyde. Acid catalysis of the reaction between formaldehyde and wood
1980 - IRG/WP 3146
Formaldehyde reacts with the free OH-groups in wood forming cross-linking bonds. The reaction can be brought about without any catalyst but in that case the activation energy is very high and high temperatures and long reaction times are needed. Normally, the reaction is catalysed by different acids. Acid catalysts, however, tend to degrade the cellulose and the wood matrix causing reduction in the strength of the wood. The effect of the specific properties of catalysts on the cross-linking and hydrolytic reactions as well as the reaction kinetics have been inadequately investigated. Investigations on the treatment of wood with formaldehyde were started in 1976 at the Forest Products Laboratory of the Technical Research Centre of Finland. In the beginning, HCl-catalysed treatments were used which proved to reduce the strength properties of wood rather strongly. In continued trials more satisfactory catalysts have been sought in order to achieve maximal formaldehyde cross-linking and minimal degradation of the wood. The tests have included various inorganic and organic acids and metal halides soluble in water as well as sulphur dioxide (SO2) and boron trifluoride (BF3) in vapour phase. Some of the results are reviewed in this paper.
T Vihavainen, K Piispanen, P Mansikkamäki


Improvements of stability and durability of beechwood (Fagus sylvatica) by means of treatment with acetic anhydride
1991 - IRG/WP 3645
In the present investigations, beechwood (Fagus sylvatica) was treated with non-catalysed acetic anhydrid at 120°C and some physical- and biological parameters of the treated wood were compared with those of non-treated wood. The radial and tangential shrinkage and swelling, respectively, and the absorption capacity of the acetylated wood against moisture is considerably lower. The durability against fungi improves. The results are discussed.
H Militz


The effects of chemical modification on the physical properties of alder and spruce particleboards
2005 - IRG/WP 05-40300
In this paper, it was aimed to improve some physical properties of chemically modified particleboard, made from spruce and alder species, spreading widely at Black sea region in Turkey. Spruce and alder chips were reacted with acetic, succinic, maleic and phthalic anhydrides at constantly heat for 3 hours then, hot pressed at 150 °C by using Phenol formaldehyde (PF) resin. Target board density was 650 kg/m3. Density, moisture content, thickness swelling and water absorption rate were determined on the chemically modified boards, reacted with four different anhydrides. Results were compared with control boards. Chemical modification of boards reacted with anhydrides resulted in improved thickness swelling and water absorption values. The best results were determined boards reacted with acetic and succinic anhydride treatments than the others.
E Dizman, Ü C Yildiz, H Kalaycioglu, S Yildiz, A Temiz, E D Gezer


Comparative field performance of CCA and CCA-water repellent treated Southern pine lumber
1995 - IRG/WP 95-30089
This paper describes the field performance of end-matched southern pine boards treated with either CCA type C or CCA type C containing an emulsion water repellent (WR) additive. Boards were either kiln or air-dried after treatment, constructed into decks, and exposed for over 3 years at Harrisburg, NC. During this exposure, matched boards were monitored for internal moisture content, cupping at midpoint, checking, and degree of nail pull. The CCA-only treated boards display rapid changes in moisture content, check width, and degree of cupping that was directly influenced by rainfall. Although boards treated with CCA and the water repellent additive are starting to lose the characteristic of surface water beading, the boards continue to show greatly improved in-service dimensional stability compared with matched CCA-only treated boards. The effectiveness of the water repellent additive in reducing physical degrade during service exposure is manifested in greatly reduced check development and nail pull when compared to the CCA-only treated boards.
A R Zahora


Dimensional stabilization and decay resistance of wood treated with brown-rotted lignin and copper sulfate
1990 - IRG/WP 3608
The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential usefulness of brown-rotted lignin (BRL) as a dimensional stabilization and copper complexing agent for wood treatment. For dimensional stabilization, aqueous solutions of the lignin extract were combined with either copper sulfate, glyoxal or other additives. Anti-shrink efficiency (ASE) values as high as 42% were obtained with wood treated with a BRL/Cu combination. By treating wood with a 6% solution of the lignin extract prior to treatment with copper sulfate, a two-fold increase in fixation of copper was attained. Soil block tests were also performed on wood treated with BRL and copper sulfate individually as well as in combination; it was found that the BRL increased the activity of Cu against Poria placenta.
L Jin, D D Nicholas, T Schultz


Restrictions on the use of chlorosilanes as potential wood preservatives
1985 - IRG/WP 3345
The biological protection of wood by chemical modification with different types of chlorosilanes has been investigated. The impregnation of wood has been carried out by means of liquid phase and vapor phase treatments using pure silane and silane-solvent systems. The biological efficacy against wood rotting fungi, molds and staining fungi was determined in a number of screening trials, subsequently followed by testing according to European Standard methods for wood preservatives. The basidiomycete tests revealed that only the dichlorosilanes showed to possess a protective action against fungal attack. Screening experiments using both filter paper and pine sapwood specimens illustrated the generally poor toxic activity of the organic silicon compounds against molds and blue staining fungi. From the observations of this study it can be concluded that future application of chlorosilanes in the wood preserving industry seems very doubtful.
M Stevens


Impregnation of timber with tannin as a mean of improving its dimensional stability
1992 - IRG/WP 92-3695
The results of a joint project carried out at the Timber Division of LNEC under the 2nd research programme of the CEC DGXII - "Wood as a renewable raw material" entitled "Stabilization of wood by impregnation processes" is presented. Pieces Maritime pine timber was impregnated with tannin under pressure to see if the treatment with tannin improved the behavior of wood regarding its dimensional stability. The results of the outdoor exposure in two different sites in Portugal and in one site in Spain will be presented in this paper.
J S Machado


Wood preservation by a mixed anhydride treatment: Using simple models of polymeric wood compounds
2008 - IRG/WP 08-30457
Treatment of wood by a mixed aceto/oleic (or other fatty acid residue) anhydride promoted as a safe and environment friendly wood preservation system has been examined quantitatively by liquid phase 13C NMR and solid phase MAS-DEC (proton decoupling) 13C NMR through all its different stages to determine which reactions occur with simple model compounds of the polymeric constituents of wood. The preparation of the mixed aceto/oleic anhydride under different conditions has been followed too. The anhydride forms but its percentage yield was found to be of the order of only 30%. The mix composed of unreacted acetic anhydride, the mixed aceto/oleic anhydride, and great proportions of free acetic acid and free oleic acid which is used for wood preservation yields acetylation of the lignin model compound (i) by reaction of the acetic anhydride with it and (ii) by reaction of the acetic part of the mixed anhydride. In this reaction the whole mixed anhydride is consumed and nothing of it is left. The oleic part of the mixed anhydride apparently is not able to form esters on lignin being far less reactive than the acetic part. Carbohydrates appears much less readily esterified, being polar enough to be repellent to the oleic residue, some acetylation occurring and some traces, and no more than traces, of carbohydrates oleic acid ester occurring too under some conditions. This system of treatment through a mixed anhydride boils down to being just an acetylation with acetic anhydride, mixed with some oleic acid as water repellent, both already known processes.
F Lyon, M-F Thevenon, A Pizzi, G Tondi, A Despres, J Gril, S Rigolet


Hydrolytic stabilization of chemically modified Bambusa vulgaris Shrad ex JC Wendl
2018 - IRG/WP 18-40830
The main drawback which greatly limit the utilisation of bamboos is their high moisture intake, biodegradation and physical properties changes with environmental variations. To prevent excessive dimensional changes and improve moisture properties of bamboo, Bambusa vulgaris was chemically treated with acetic-anhydride without co-solvent. To evaluate the influence of acetylation on the moisture properties. The weight gain (WPG), Bulking coefficient (BC), Rate of reaction (RR), Volumetric Swelling (VS) and Anti-swelling Efficiency as well as changes in VS and ASE upon long term water soaking and weight loss to leaching (WL) were determined. The results indicated no significant effect of reaction temperature and time on the WPG, BC, VS and ASE of the acetylated bamboo while reaction time had significant influence on RR and WL. None of the bamboo samples had more than 3.67% WPG and 54.69 % ASE. The maximum values of ASE of acetylated bamboo was 54.69% at 2.785 WPG while the lowest 13.08% was recorded at 2.89% WPG. However, at the lowest WPG of 1.61 %, ASE of 35.88% was recorded while the highest WPG of 3.67% gave ASE of 32.84 %. ASE varied from 13.08 % to 54.69% the lowest being recorded at 140oC, 30 mins reaction time while the highest (54.69%) was recorded at 100oC, 90 minutes reaction time. Temperature had no influence on the initial and final volumetric swelling and final anti-swelling efficiency of the modified bamboo samples but reaction time had significant effect on initial ASE. Volumetric swelling of modified samples increased from 8.47 to 18.58% while the unmodified samples swelled from 9.42% to 43.22% within 7 days water soaking period. Acetic anhydride form chemical bonds that are stable to solvent extraction in B. vulgaris. Acetylating at 120°C for 30 and 60 minutes is suitable for B. vulgaris to positively influence its sorption properties.
N A Sadiku, S M Akintayo


Dimensional stability and decay resistance of hot-melt self-bonded particleboard by surface benzylated pine chips
1991 - IRG/WP 3652
Akamatsu (Pinus densiflora Sieb. et Zucc: Japanese red pine) particles were pretreated with 40% NaOH solution and benzylated with benzyl chloride, and the surface of particle was converted into meltable materials. Hot-melt self bonded particleboard having smooth and high glossiness surface was prepared by hot pressing at 150°C and 1.96 MPa without using any conventional adhesives. Dimensional stability and decay resistance of the benzylated particleboard were evaluated. Particleboards made of benzylated particles having more than 38% of weight percent gain (WPG) showed that dimensional stability and decay resistance were superior to the conventional particleboard made by using phenolformaldehyde resin as a binder, because hydroxyl groups of wood were substituted by hydrophobic benzyl groups with benzylation. Though bending strength of the board was a little lower than control board due to the damage of benzylated particles during benzylation, its internal bonding strength was very high, because the hot-melting strengthened the inter-particle bonding.
M Kiguchi, K Yamamoto


Effects of acetylation on the dimensional stability and decay resistance of kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.) fiberboard
1996 - IRG/WP 96-40059
The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of the acetylation treated kenaf fiber, Phenol formaldehyde resin content level, and three fungi species on the dimensional stability and decay resistance of high density non wood composition boards. A standard ASTM method was used to evaluate weight loss and thickness change. The linear shrinkage and expansion of each species were also determined. All specimens were exposed to decay chambers for 16 weeks. Test results indicated that most of the main factors significantly influence the thickness, length changes, and decay resistance of the high density kenaf fiberboards.
P Chow, T Harp, R Meimban, J A Youngquist, R M Rowell


Treatment of particleboard with isocyanate resin to impart improved dimensional stability and water repellency
2000 - IRG/WP 00-40178
Standard particleboard panels (for interior use) of 16 mm nominal thickness were cut into samples measuring 6.4 mm x 78 mm2. The samples were divided into 4 end matched batches. Two batches were treated with isocyanate resin and cured. The other 2 batches were left untreated. One of the treated batched and 1 of the untreated batches were edge sealed with epoxy resin prior to isocyanate resin application. The weight and thickness of each samples was measured prior to placing the sample in a beaker of distilled water. The weight and thickness were measured periodically for 1 week. Treatment with isocyanate resin reduced the average weight gain of sealed samples compared to the controls after 1 week. The average weight gain after 144 hours was 37% and 63% respectively while unsealed samples achieved a weight gain of 37% and 100% respectively. The thickness swelling was also reduced in the sealed samples compared to the controls (10% and 17% respectively) and the unsealed samples had a thickness swelling of 9% and 21% respectively. The results show a reduction in the rate of moisture uptake (water repellency) and amount (dimensional stability). Further experiments are described comparing particleboard with solid wood, with and without isocyanate resin application.
K M Filcock, P Vinden


Effect of double-vacuum and vacuum-pressure impregnation with water-borne preservatives on the dimensional characteristics of spruce
1990 - IRG/WP 3613
Air-dried planed spruce (Picea abies) samples were treated with a water-borne preservative (micro-emulsion) and one oil-borne type both containing azaconazole and deltamethrin. Each set of samples contained equal number of specimens with different growth ring orientation, heartwood content and density. In addition to the preservative retention and the penetration of a.i., the swelling of the samples was measured immediately after impregnation and further after 6, 24 and 48 hours. The growth ring figure induced different uptake levels when the impregnation process was intensified. Gradual increase of tangential surfaces reduced the retention. The effect of the wood properties on liquid absorption seemed to be greater for the oil-borne treatment. Volumetric swelling of the test samples treated with the water-borne solutions ranged from 0,5 to 0,6% immediately after double-vacuum impregnation increasing to a maximum of 0,8% 6 hours later. Subsequent air-drying of treated samples did not produce checking nor deformation. The oil-borne preservative gave rise to a swelling 3 to 4 times less. A swelling of 0,8% for spruce treated with a water-borne preservative may be considered acceptable taking into consideration volumetric movement figures of 1 to 1,5% for tropical hardwood species, classified as low movement timbers.
J Van Acker, M Stevens, G Rustenburg


Biological degradation resistance of pine wood treated with dimethylol compounds
1989 - IRG/WP 3528
The study reports the increase of dimensional stability and biological degradation resistance of pine wood (Pinus sylvestris L) after impregnation with dimethyloldibydroxyethyleneurea. Decay resistance was determined according to BS 838:961. Nearly complete protection against Coniophora puteana, (Schum.ex Fr. Karst) weight loss of 2-3% was shown when modification, expressed as weight gain, exceeded 15%. Resistance to biological attack of modified wood is speculated to be due to modification of the wood components and cross linking with dimethyloldihydroxyethyleneurea.
C L Videlov


Heat treatment of wood strands for OSB production: Effect on the mechanical properties, water absorption and dimensional stability
2002 - IRG/WP 02-40238
The effect of heat treatment on the mechanical and physical properties of commercial OSB strands was evaluated. Heat treatment was applied under inert atmospheric conditions to wood strands. The aim of this study was to examine the heat treatment parameters to achieve significant reduction of thickness swelling (upon exposure to moisture in service) without causing excessive reductions in strength. Heat treatments of 200, 210, 220, 230, 240, 250, and 260°C for 20 minutes were applied and swelling tests were performed. Subsequently the modulus of rupture and modulus of elasticity were measured in wood strands. High temperature treatments resulted in significant reductions in thickness swelling of wood strands but resulted in 20% reductions of modulus of rupture and modulus of elasticity.
G J Goroyias, M D C Hale


Dimensional stability, biological resistance, and mechanical properties of phenol-resin-treated particleboard
1990 - IRG/WP 3622
Particleboards were treated with a low molecular-weight phenol-formaldehyde (PF) resin and their enhanced properties were evaluated. Besides dipping of particles in aqeous solutions of resin, and spraying of resin solutions before spray of the conventional phenol-formaldehyde resin for adhesive binder, one step treatment by spraying of the mixture of the low molecular-weight resin and the adhesive resin was also employed. After 2-hour boiling, the boards treated at 10% incorporated resin loading (IRL) retained 80% of their strength values in a dry condition. The internal bond strength increased with increasing IRLs, and the boards of 20% IRL showed twice of the value of untreated controls in the same level of board density. Treated particleboards resulted in a more dramatic reduction in the rate of swelling even at low resin loadings. Results obtained from accelerated laboratory tests on biodegradation suggested that incorporated resin-solids worked well to enhance decay and termite resistance of particleboards.
Y Imamura, H Kajita


Biodegradation of acetylated southern pine and aspen composition boards
1994 - IRG/WP 94-40020
This objective of this study was to investigate the influence of the acetylation treated wood fiber, Phenol-formaldehyde resin content level, two wood fiber species, three fungi species on the dimensional stability and decay resistence of high density composition boards. A standard ASTM method was used to evaluate weight loss and thickness change. The linear shrinkage and expansion of each species were also determined. All specimens were exposed to decay chambers for 16 weeks. Test results indicated that most of the main factors significantly influence the thickness and length changes and the decay resistance of the high density composition boards.
P Chow, T Harp, R Meimban, J A Youngquist, R M Powell


Acetylation of lignocellulosic materials
1989 - IRG/WP 3516
A simplified procedure for the acetylation of lignocellulosic materials has been developed. The acetylation is done with a limited amount of liquid acetic anhydride without the addition of a catalyst or an organic co-solvent. Dimensional stability and biological resistance are both much improved by the acetylation. Equilibrium moisture content in acetylated material is considerably lower than in unmodified material. No reduction of bending strength was found for acetylated solid wood samples. The process can be employed for both fibers, wood particles and solid wood. The process is applicable to hardwoods and softwoods, including solid spruce wood, and to non-wood fibers such as jute.
P Larsson, A-M Tillman


The effect of high temperature and long pressing time on the dimensional stability and decay resistance of OSB
2002 - IRG/WP 02-40237
The exterior use of OSB is restricted because when it is exposed to wet conditions swelling, loss of internal bond strength (IB) and decay occur. In this study an alternative process of pressing which results in the production of dimensionally stable and a more decay resistant strandboard was investigated. Boards were pressed at elevated temperatures for prolonged pressing cycles and their physical (thickness swelling and water absorption after 2 and 24 hours soak), mechanical properties (IB, MOR, MOE) and decay resistance were assessed. Analysis of variance (ANOVA, p=0.005) between pressing time/temperature and each property tested were used for the assessment of the results. The decay resistance of the boards was tested according to a draft European standard (DD ENV 12038: 1996) with a slight modification to the sample size. Boards were tested against Coniophora puteana, Postia placenta, Trametes versicolor and Pleurotus ostreatus. The results of this study showed that the increase of pressing time and temperature resulted in significant reductions in the thickness swelling and water absorption of the boards. The treatment had little effect on board mechanical properties. The resistance to fungal biodegradation was significantly improved at the higher temperature / pressing time combinations tested. The results of this study show that the production of a dimensionally stable and a more decay resistant OSB is possible without excessive use of preservative chemicals. If adopted these findings may lead to the development of new wood-based panel products (non-preserved dimensional stable and decay resistant hazard class 3-OSB) which may replace preservative treated plywood and solid wood for many exterior construction applications.
G J Goroyias, M D C Hale


Three dimensional computer representations of growth of microbial populations in wood
1984 - IRG/WP 1243
Creosoted distribution poles inoculated with either Lentinus lepideus, biological control organisms including Triochoderma or combinations of both were extensively sampled to monitor the spread of organisms. A computer program which enabled the results to be portrayed in a three dimensional graphic form was developed and is illustrated. Results showed that computer mapping of this type usefully enabled microbial interactions in wood to be evaluated.
A Bruce, B King, C Bruce, G M Smith


Effects of boron treatments on partially decayed oak and pitch pine heartwood
1996 - IRG/WP 96-30106
This paper reports results of borate based preservative treatment and leaching experiments on partially decayed oak and pitch pine heartwood. Previous experiments have shown little damage is caused to sound timber of these types when treated with Polybor and Boracol 20 preservatives. This experiment was carried out to assess the suitability of selected borate based preservatives for use in historical ships' timbers and therefore the physical effects of these preservatives on such timber was investigated. The results indicate that weight losses incurred due to treatment with Polybor or Boracol 20 are no more damaging than those incurred by treatment with water. Weight changes were more apparent in decayed timber than in sound timber with greater uptakes in non-leached samples and greater weight losses in leached samples. However, comparable weight changes were recorded between water treated samples and preservative treated samples. Dimensional changes were minimal in most cases, the greatest found in non-leached Boracol 20 samples as expected. These results indicate that treatment with these preservatives is suitable for partially decayed oak and pitch pine heartwood.
S McCutcheon, G M Smith, J W Palfreyman, P Durrant


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