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Basidiosporogenesis by the white-rot basidiomycetes in vitr
1994 - IRG/WP 94-10081
Basidiospores of all forest-inhabiting basidiomycetes are a primary source of infection causing wood decay. However, most studies evaluating wood preservatives have used mycelia or basidiospores obtained from wild mushrooms. The objective of this study was to demonstrate in vitro methods that promote carpogenesis and basidiosporogenesis by the white-rot basidiomycetes, Schizophyllum commune and Trametes versicolor. After preincubation in the dark at 27°C for three to fifteen days, basidiospores were produced in four to sixteen weeks in basidiomes exposed to light at 12°C. Adequate light exposure, aeration, and low temperature treatment after preincubation are essential for fruiting body of these white-rotting basidiomycetes. Carpogenesis and basidiosporogenesis of Schizophyllum commune is controlled by nitrogen and carbon limitation. However, fruiting body formation in Trametes versicolor was induced by nitrogen limitation. Walset cellulose was found to be the best carboun source for carpogenesis and subsequent basidiosporogenesis. These results demonstrate the feasibility of using various potential inhibitors on basidiospore germination rather than relying on mycelial growth.
S C Croan


Conditions for basidiospore production in the brown rot fungus Gloeophyllum separium in axenic culture
1984 - IRG/WP 1232
Attempts to control and optimize the production of hymenial structures and basidiospore production in Gloeophyllum sepiarium in axenic culture resulted in the proposal of the following conditions as being suitable. The dikaryotic mycelia originally isolated from basidiocarps could consistently be induced to produce hymenial structures and pure basidiospore collects if illuminated by near ultraviolet light with emission maximum at 355 nm ("black light") at a temperature of 15°C on a chemically defined medium, where the concentration of the carbon and the nitrogen sources were shown to be of critical significance. The necessary conditions for basidiospore production in lignicolous fungi in general are is briefly discussed.
J Bjurman


Basidiosporogenesis by brown-rot basidiomycetes in vitro
1995 - IRG/WP 95-10126
Basidiospores of wood-rotting basidiomycetes are a primary sourse of infection causing wood biodeterioration, especially in wood above ground. Most studies evaluating wood preservatives have used mycelia or basidiospores obtained from wild mushrooms. The objective of this study was to demonstrate in vitro methods that promote carpogenesis and basidiosporogenesis by the brown-rot fungi Antrodia carbonisa, Neolentinus lepideus, and Postia placenta. After preincubation in the dark at 27°C for 3 to 11 days, basidiospores were easily prodused in 1 to 4 months by basidiomata exposed to light at 12°C. Adequate light exposure, aeration, and low temperature treatment after preincubation are essential for fruiting body formation of these brown-rot basidiomycetes. The morphology of the basidiomata differed according to the basidiomycetes and the medium used. These results demonstrate that an enormous quantity of basidiosporee can be easily and continuously prodused in 2 to 4 months in vitro.
S C Croan


Bioconversion of wood wastes into gourmet and medicinal mushrooms
1999 - IRG/WP 99-50129
Increased wood wastes, including thinned material from stagnated and overstocked small-diameter forests, are a menace to forest health, to the sustainability of ecosystems, and to community economic viability. The objective of this study is to recycle wood wastes into value-added products, such as gourmet and medicinal mushrooms, by using the white-rot basidiomycetes, Pleurotus ostreatus, P. populinus, P. pulmonarius, and other Pleurotus species. When supplemented with low concentrations of dextrose, these basidiomycetes exhibit an excellent ability to colonize and stimulate fruiting body production on wood wastes. Inoculated wood wastes in air-permeable bags are incubated at 24°C in the dark for 3 to 5 weeks. When exposed to light cycle (10-h day), humidity, and air, they fruit within 4 to 8 weeks. Lyophilization of cultures stimulates filamentous mycelial growth and fruiting is then initiated within 3 to 7 days.
S C Croan


Influence of abiotic factors on the production of Basidiocarps by lignocellulolitic Hymenomycetes from native forest and plantations of Pinus elliottii Engelm in the Fontes do Ipiranga State Park, São Paulo, Brazil
1991 - IRG/WP 1469
A report on the influence of abiotic factors on the production of basidiocarps by lignocellulotic Hymenomycetes of native forest and Pinus elliottii. It was concluded that the climatic conditions (temperature, humidity, microhabitat) and the decay stage of the logs affected the production of basidiocarps by Hymenomycetes.
M Aparecida de Jesus


The effect of storage and subculturing on in vitro fruit body formation and spore production in Gloeophyllum sepiarium and Oligoporus placentus
2001 - IRG/WP 01-20232
Spores are widely assumed to be the main mode of infection of wood in conditions conducive to decay above ground. In order to supply spores on demand as an experimental material, fruiting body and basidiospore production in vitro by Gloeophyllum sepiarium and Oligoporus placentus have been examined. The optimum medium, time to spore production, and duration of fruiting as well as fruiting body shape varied among strains of both species. Even when the same strain was used as the inoculum source, there were differences in duration of fruiting and time to spore production in different experimental sets. This suggests that the method of mycelium storage and repeated subculturing could affect fungal capacity for fruiting and basidiospore production. Among the tested methods of mycelium storage, mycelia stored on wood blocks showed the most stable response in both fruiting and spore production.
S Choi, J N R Ruddick, P I Morris


Evaluation of white-rot fungal growth on Southern Yellow pine wood chips pretreated with blue-stain fungi
2000 - IRG/WP 00-10349
White-rotting basidiomycetes do not colonize on southern yellow pine. This study seeks to reduce the resinous extractive content of southern yellow pine by treating it with blue stain fungi. The mycelial growth of wood-inhabiting ligninolytic white-rot fungi can be achieved on pretreated southern yellow pine wood. Aureobasidium, Ceratocystis, and Ophiostoma spp. removed 70% to 100% of the extractives from the southern yellow pine wood within a period of 3 to 6 days. Griofora fondosa, Hericium erinaceus, and Pleurotus ostreatus colonized readily after the treatment. As a result, ligninolytic white-rot fungi can be easily colonized on southern yellow pines pretreated with blue stain fungi.
S C Croan


Succession after Fire of Fungal Fruiting Bodies in Mediterranean Pinus pinaster Stands in Spain
2012 - IRG/WP 12-10789
In this study we present the results of a 4-year survey aimed at describing the succession of fungal communities following fire in a Mediterranean ecosystem in Northwest Spain, dominated by Pinus pinaster Ait. After a large wildfire in 2002, six 2 x 50 m study plots were established in burned and unburned areas corresponding to early and late succession stages. During the autumn seasons from 2003 to 2006, fruiting bodies were collected and identified. We also collected information about dry and fresh weight, the saprotrophic or mycorrhizal status and the edibility of every species. During the four-years sampling, a total of 115 fungal taxa were collected (85 in the late stage and 60 in the early stage) from which only 30 appeared along the whole succession. Mycorrhizal population not only increased the number of species from early to late stage but also shifted in composition. After fire, pyrophytic species such as Pholiota carbonaria, Peziza violacea, Rhizopogon luteolus and Rhizopogon sp. appeared. The effect of fire on fungal fruiting body’s production was opposite depending on the saprotrophic or mycorrhizal status of the species: mycorrhizal decreased 6-fold, while saprotrophic increased 4-fold. Production of edible species was negatively affected by fire, decreasing significantly the potential of rural populations to harvest marketable mushrooms. The provided results can be useful to forest managers for optimization of management and harvest of these increasingly appreciated non-wood resources. Management may also prevent or alleviate stand-replacing wildfire in these Mediterranean forests.
P Vásquez Gassibe, M Hernández-Rodriguez, R Fraile Fabero, J A Oria-De-Rueda, P Martín-Pinto